Monthly Archives: October 2015

Children’s Choir Leads Worship this Sunday

IMG_0987Worship the Lord with gladness; come into his presence with singing.  Psalm 100:2

I believe it is important for our children and youth to experience what it means to be the choir in church: prepare the music, learn what the words mean, sing and play instruments the best you can, and lead the congregation in hymns and responses…and of course have fun while doing it! This Sunday, the adult choir will be in the pews while the Children’s Choir takes its place in the choir loft. June Gladding, highly skilled at arranging music for children, has been preparing the choir and will direct them.

 

Call to Worship

Praise

traditional round, arranged by Gladding

Hymn of Praise

This is My Father’s World

Words, Babcock, The title recalls an expression Babcock used when starting a walk: “I’m going out to see my Father’s world.”  Music, Terra Beata, traditional English melody

 

Anthem

Love the Lord with All Your Heart

the Great Commandment, Matthew 22, Mark 12, Luke 10

Communion Hymn

Seek Ye First

Colin McLean, recorder

Benediction

Go with Us, Lord

choir accompanies congregation using our new xylophones

worship

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Earth, Stars, Planets…

sky“Earth and All Stars”

Being an early riser (even though I don’t always want to be), I have become a wannabe astronomer.  Recently I discovered the incredibly bright planet Venus in the early morning eastern sky.  You might be surprised to discover you can still see it even after the Sun clears the eastern horizon!  On October 25, Venus climbs higher before dawn than at any other time this decade. Jupiter, Mars, and Mercury round out the striking quartet that awaits early risers.

All this is a roundabout way to explain the choice of our call to worship this Sunday.  Inspired by Psalms 96, 98, and 150, “Earth and All Stars” is a relatively new hymn, initially published in 1968 as part of a folksong collection and now found in 27 hymnals. Lutheran pastor Herbert Brokering  wrote the words, and David Johnson’s excellent tune complements the text beautifully.

I’m not sure what “loud, rushing planets” are, but Brokering uses the descriptor “loud” a dozen times in the hymn, so I’m choosing to believe we don’t have to be quiet when praising God.

Earth and all stars!  Loud rushing planets!
Sing to the Lord a new song!
Hail, wind, and rain, Loud blowing snowstorms
Sing to the Lord a new song!

He has done marvelous things.  I too will praise Him with a new song!

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Come and sing in our Christmas cantata!

cantata 

Practices Wednesdays, October 14 – December 16, 8:00 – 8:45 in the Sanctuary

All are welcome!

Cantata December 20 at the 11am worship

 

 

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Joyful, Joyful, We Adore Thee

Come and sing in our Christmas cantata!

 cantata

 Wednesdays, October 14 – December 16, 8:00 – 8:45 in the Sanctuary

All are welcome!

Cantata December 20 at the 11am worship

A Hymn for this Sunday: Joyful, Joyful, We Adore Theedownload (1)

One of the best-known hymns in the English language, Henry Van Dyke’s poem of 1907 was inspired by the beauty of the Berkshire mountains in Massachusetts, where he was guest preaching at Williams College.

 

It has been said that Van Dyke handed the poem to the president of the college, saying: “Here is a hymn for you. Your mountains were my inspiration. It must be sung to the music of Beethoven’s ‘Hymn to Joy.’”

The text seems to follow the creation story:

 

  • Earth was dark, God created light (stanza 1).

 Melt the clouds of sin and sadness; Drive the dark of doubt away…Fill us with the light of day!

 

  • God created water, plants and trees, and every living creature (stanza 2).

 Field and forest, vale and mountain, flowery meadow, flashing sea…Chanting bird and flowing fountain…

 

  • God created man and woman (stanza 3, sadly omitted in the Presbyterian Hymnal).

 Always giving and forgiving, ever blessing, ever blest…Teach us how to love each other…


The adaptation of Beethoven’s stirring melody from the final movement of his Ninth Symphony is an excellent companion to this text. Though other texts have been paired with Beethoven’s music, Van Dyke’s is by far the most popular.

 

Joyful music leads us sunward in the triumph song of life.

(from stanza 4)

 

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Come and Sing in Our Christmas Cantata

Come and sing in our Christmas Cantata!

cantataWhen:  Wednesdays, October 14 – December 16, 8:00 – 8:45

Where: In the Sanctuary

All are welcome!

Cantata December 20 at the 11am worship

 

download (1)Hymns for Sunday

Come Thou Fount of Every Blessing – Robert Robinson (1735-1790) was eight years old at the time of his father’s death. He was a very bright, headstrong boy who became difficult for his mother to handle. When Robert turned 14, she sent him to London for an apprenticeship with a barber. Robert continued to get into trouble, drinking and gambling with his friends.

At 17, Robert and some of his drinking buddies decided to attend an evangelistic meeting and make fun of the proceedings. When George Whitfield began to preach, Robert felt as if the sermon was just for him. Three years later, he finally yielded his life to Christ, and answered a call to the ministry. As he was preparing to preach a sermon, Robert wrote “Come Thou Fount of Every Blessing” to complement his message. The music for the hymn was composed by Asahel Nettleton in 1813.

 

Lord, I Want to Be a Christian is an African-American spiritual, probably composed in 1750s Virginia by African-American slaves exposed to the teaching of evangelist Samuel Davies. The music and lyrics were first printed in the 1907 Folk Songs of the American Negro, edited by Frederick Work. The song has been recorded by such artists as Yolanda Adams, Chanticleer, and the Mormon Tabernacle Choir.

 

 

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World Communion Sunday Music

global music

World Communion Sunday is a celebration that promotes Christian unity and ecumenical cooperation. It is observed on the first Sunday of October.

 

Our worship music Sunday will reflect the universality of Christian music.   The 1990 Presbyterian Hymnal did a terrific job of introducing global music to the Presbyterian Church.  And the 2003 hymnal supplement Sing the Faith includes even more world music from Europe Africa, and Asia, as well as African-American and Hispanic American music.

Call To Worship

Come Now, O Prince of Peace

Korea

Hymn

Siyahamba

South Africa, Zulu melody

Anthem  

African Psalm

Based on a Kenyan folk song

Communion Hymn

Let Us Talents and Tongues Employ

Jamaica

Hymn

In Christ There is No East or West

African-American Spiritual

Benediction

Sent Out in Jesus’ Name

Cuba

 

Percussion is an important part of most folk music, especially music of Africa, the Caribbean and Central/South America. Our percussionists, Roy Rinehart, June Gladding and Carolyn Tate, will use several authentic instruments to accompany our singing. Keith Scroggs will play clarinet at the postlude.

 

Come and worship with us!

 

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